Rush to rent, and build apartments

By Jim Weiker
Published: June 30, 2012
The Columbia Dispatch

The 5,000 apartments under development in central Ohio were of no help to Lindsay Earle and Courtney Georg.

The roommates recently discovered that in popular parts of town, renters far outnumber apartments.

With solid jobs, good credit and references, they figured they could easily find an apartment or house in German Village, the Short North or Grandview Heights for less than $1,400 a month.

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AIA/LA Healthy by Design Panel Addresses How Best to Incentivize Healthier Placemaking

Published: June 29, 2012
The Planning Report

TPR presents excerpts from a June panel, ‘Experiencing Healthier Places’, at the AIA Design Conference in LA.  Moderated by TPR editor-in-chief David Abel, the panel included: Chet Widom (State Architect, State of California), Kate Diamond (Principal, HMC Architects), Dr. Jonathan Fielding (Director, LA County Dept. of Public Health), and Dr. Richard Jackson  (Chair, Environmental Health Studies, UCLA).  Their discussion explores the adequacy of present planning and architecture in addressing health today.

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Moving home: The new key to success

By Will Doig
Published: June 23, 2012
Salon.com

After nine years in Brooklyn, N.Y., Emily Farris, Midwestern cuisine queen, decided she was sick of baking tuna casseroles in a kitchen that was also a hallway. “I was sharing a tiny apartment. I wanted to live like an adult,” she says, “and in New York I couldn’t afford to do that.”

So she started thinking about where else she might like to live: Austin, Texas, Portland, Ore., maybe Chicago. But then, in 2008, she flew to her hometown of Kansas City to promote her new cookbook. “I was sitting in this plaza where there were lots of shops and restaurants,” she says. “I saw buses with bike racks on them. When I left Kansas City [in 2000] it seemed suburban and boring. But when I came back to visit, I saw people I wanted to be friends with.”

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More people seek downtown living

By Edie Grossfield
Published: June 23, 2012
postbulletin.com

Two years ago, Barry Skolnick moved from his longtime home of New York City to downtown Rochester.

Having just retired, he traded a lively, fast-paced, urban life for one a bit slower-paced, although just as engaging, he said.

He had lived in New York City since age 2, and now he’s happy living in downtown Rochester.

“We were looking for a place to live where the air was fresher and a little bit cleaner; kind of a slightly slower pace but still a lot activities. And a place where there’s a good medical center,” Skolnick said

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Moving home: The new key to success

By Will Doig
Published: June 23, 2012
salon.com

After nine years in Brooklyn, N.Y., Emily Farris, Midwestern cuisine queen, decided she was sick of baking tuna casseroles in a kitchen that was also a hallway. “I was sharing a tiny apartment. I wanted to live like an adult,” she says, “and in New York I couldn’t afford to do that.”

So she started thinking about where else she might like to live: Austin, Texas, Portland, Ore., maybe Chicago. But then, in 2008, she flew to her hometown of Kansas City to promote her new cookbook. “I was sitting in this plaza where there were lots of shops and restaurants,” she says. “I saw buses with bike racks on them. When I left Kansas City [in 2000] it seemed suburban and boring. But when I came back to visit, I saw people I wanted to be friends with.”

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What if bus stops were designed as if bus stops really mattered?

By Kaid Benfield
Published: June 20, 2012
Sustainable Cities Collective

When I was a kid growing up in Asheville, bus stops were marked with stenciled lettering on utility poles.  It was fairly primitive, other than perhaps at the busy downtown transfer points, Pritchard Park and Pack Square, where if I recall correctly there was some indication of which routes stopped at which points.

Although the experience was pretty basic, I took the city buses everywhere.  Underage for driving, I didn’t have access to a car, and the place was big enough that many things I wanted to do – visit friends, go to school, go to the tennis courts, buy music, whatever – required transit, especially with both my parents busy working.  I liked being independent and enjoyed being able to get around.

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The Fall of the Creative Class

By Frank Bures
Published: June 15, 2012
ThirtyTwo Magazine.

In the late 1990s, my wife and I got in a U-Haul, hit I-90 and headed west for a few days until we came to Port­land, Ore­gon. We had no jobs, no apart­ment, and no notion other than get­ting out of Minnesota.

We chose Port­land mainly because it was cheaper than the other places we’d liked on a month-long road trip through the West (San Fran­cisco, Seat­tle, Mis­soula), because it had a great book store we both fell in love with, and because I had a cousin who lived there in the north­east part of the city, which was some­what less trendy back then. (Our first night, police found a body in the park across the street.) The plan was to stay a year, then try the other coast, then who knows? We were young! But we loved it and stayed for nearly five years. Then, when we started think­ing of breed­ing, like salmon, we decided to swim back to the pool in which we were bred.

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